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Glossary

ALPACA
The alpaca is indigenous to the Andes Mountains of Peru. Its soft fibers are hollow inside – the secret to their superior insulation. Whatever climate you're indigenous to, this is one sustainable fiber you really must try cozying up in.

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BOILED WOOL
When knitted wool is compressed just so in a hot water-based solution, the result is a richer, softer, more substantial wool with characteristics similar to those of felt. Its newfound density adds warmth and water repellency as well.

BOUCLE
The word boucle can describe both a fabric and the yarn that's used to make it. Boucle yarn has an irregular finish, created by combining two or more strands, one pulled tightly and another left loose. This results in a looped appearance that lends texture to a sweater or jacket. It's a French word, as you may have guessed, which translates to buckled or curled.

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CASHMERE
We'll say it: our cashmere is the cashmere of cashmere. The most premium of fibers, cashmere is just achingly soft. And Ryllace cashmere is born in Inner Mongolia, the source of what we consider the finest to be found. The purebred Kashmir goats there are typically combed by hand once a year. Their precious, downy under hair is truly a gift.

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DOLMAN SLEEVES
Although dolman sleeves can vary in design, the defining characteristic is a wide, voluminous opening at the top of the arm. Some dolman sleeves, often the shorter ones, are equally roomy at the cuffs, while others taper gradually to more-fitted hems. 

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EYELASH LACE
Eyelash lace has "whiskers" along the edges that look a bit like eyelashes. It's a decidedly feminine lace trim.

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LABRADORITE
Discovered in 1770 in Labrador, Canada, the labradorite gemstone is treasured for its notable play of color, or "labradorescence." The stone is made up of layers that refract light in hues from deepest blue to various shades of pale green, gray-green, dark gray, even gold and coppery red.

LINEN
Linen is one of the oldest textiles on earth, and ours is among the finest, as it comes from extra-long fibers of pure flax, organically sourced whenever possible. Linen is breathable, comfortable in warm weather, has excellent color fastness, and is naturally antibacterial.

LUG SOLE
Originally a functional feature, lug soles have a thick tread with deep grooves that provide greater traction. Traditionally seen on work boots or hiking boots, lug soles became fashionable with the grunge movement of the 1990s and are now a footwear mainstay. Meaning you can walk with confidence in any season, for a number of reasons.

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MERINO WOOL
Don't think wool, think Merino wool. Soft as it is warm – because a Merino fiber is about one third the diameter of a human hair. Merino also helps regulate body temperature naturally by conveying sweat away as vapor. It even helps cancel out odors caused by bacteria.

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ORGANIC COTTON
Organic cotton is grown without pesticides or other toxic chemicals. Natural biological methods such as crop rotation, organic fertilizers, and beneficial insects make it possible. It's about what you want against your skin, and what you don’t: softness yes, chemicals no.

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POINTELLE
Pointelle is an "openwork" knit that designers use to create delicate, varied, textured looks. It can comprise an entire garment, which will be cooler than a solid knit, or it can be a design highlight.

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RAGLAN SLEEVES
Rather than connecting to the bodice at a seam on the shoulders, raglan sleeves extend to the collarbone. Need a visual? Picture a vintage baseball tee, the quintessential example of raglan sleeves.

RUANA
Similar to a poncho, a ruana is made with a single large piece of fabric, but it's open in the front from the neck all the way down to the hemline. Often oversized, a ruana can be styled many ways, from simply draping it, to belting it, to pinning it with a broach. Ruanas are a traditional garment in the Andes region of Colombia, where they’re also used as blankets.

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SILK
We've chosen Mulberry, an especially luxurious silk, for its refined finish and durability. Its name originates with the Mulberry tree leaves the silkworms munch on. Silk is also hypoallergenic (and that’s nothing to sneeze at).

SPANDEX
Spandex is a synthetic fiber sometimes referred to as Lycra® or elastane.It adds stretch to fabric. The word spandex is an anagram of "expands."

SURPLICE
A garment with an overlapping front in which two halves cross diagonally, sometimes creating a dramatic deep v.

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TENCEL LYOCELL KNIT
We've merged two favorite fibers to create one sensational fabric. TENCEL Lyocell is popular for its luster, its softness, its fluid drape. (It really has it all.) One of the most eco-friendly fibers anywhere, TENCEL Lyocell is made from the wood pulp of fast-growing, renewable eucalyptus trees. Closed-loop production requires less water and energy than other materials. For comfort and fit, we’ve added 5% spandex.

TENCEL LYOCELL MICRO TERRY
The big story is the soft, soft, soft micro terry inside against your skin with the thoughtfulness of one of the most eco-friendly fibers around: TENCEL Lyocell. It's made from the wood pulp of fast-growing, renewable eucalyptus trees. It's naturally wicking, making this fabric a favorite for active and travel days. We've added 7% spandex for even more comfort and stretch.

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UTILITY JACKET
Sometimes referred to as an army, military, or cargo jacket, a utility jacket takes its cues from the field coats worn by soldiers in the middle of the twentieth century. First adopted into fashion in the 1960s and 70s, these designs have since become a unisex style staple. 

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VAMP
The vamp is the section of the shoe that extends over your toes to the top of your foot. A vamp can be low (ending just above your toes) or high (extending past your toes to your ankle or calf). Perhaps surprisingly (well, we were surprised), high boots fall into the low-vamp category because there’s no line to break the flow from the tip of the toes to the top of the shaft. Who knew?   

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